Election 2016 Only half of Africans trust the ECs - Afrobarometer

A group of people believe they can be the great managers the people are looking for so they submit their names to the people. Then the people selected who they think is the very best among them. The ones with the highest number of selections gets the job.

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play The researchers used data gathered in 2014 and 2015 from 36 African countries to come to these conclusions.
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Conducting free and fair elections is one of the most important exercises a democratic country has to undertake. Elections ensure that the people can choose who they want to entrust responsibility and resources to for effective management.

A group of people believe they can be the great managers the people are looking for so they submit their names to the people. Then the people selected who they think is the very best among them. The ones with the highest number of selections gets the job.

However, elections are not that simple especially in many African countries. There are almost always accusations of irregularities such as over voting, ballot stuffing, vote buying and intimidation of voters and electoral officers.

Afrobaromater, which describes itself as ‘a pan African, non-partisan research network’ has been looking into the complexities of election in Africa.

The organisation has just published research findings about public trust in elections on the continent.

As the days count closer to election day in Ghana, it would be great to reflect on some of its findings.

Here are the top five finding from the survey.

  • 44 percent of those surveyed said they don’t trust in their electoral commissions at all or trust them just a little.

  • In Ghana, 37 percent of respondents said they don’t trust the Electoral Commission.

  • On average, 70 percent of respondents said voters are bribed or at least sometimes.

  • 42 percent of respondents said the elections are an opportunity for the people’s views to be represented.

  • 40 percent of respondents believe that elections enable the people to remove non-performing leaders.

Despite these startling numbers, ‘majority of citizens say their most recent elections were mostly free and fair’, according to Afrobarometer.

The researchers used data gathered in 2014 and 2015 from 36 African countries to come to these conclusions. Twenty-five African countries have or will conduct national elections in 2016 and 2017.

Violence broke out in Gabon when Ali Bongo was announced as the winner of the September polls; beating his closest rival by only 6,000 votes. The claim that there was over 90 percent turnout in Bongo’s stronghold areas is widely disputed by the opposition and election observers.

Ghana goes to the polls on December 7, 2016 to elect parliamentarians and a president that will manage the country until 2020.

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